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SIEPR Predoctoral Research Fellowship Opportunities

Now Accepting Applications »

The SIEPR/Economics Predoctoral Research Fellowship program is a full-time, post baccalaureate program designed to prepare individuals wishing to gain valuable training and experience toward a career in academic research in economics or public policy. Fellows will be expected to fully engage in the intellectual life at Stanford University. They dedicate a significant portion of their time to an empirical research project and can take graduate-level courses at Stanford University for credit (up to one course per quarter). The fellowship offers tuition, health insurance, and a living stipend ($48,000 in 2017-2018). 

We seek highly skilled and motivated individuals to join our full-time Predoctoral Research Fellows position for a period of at least one year. The positions are based at the Institute for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. Fellows start in June or July, although a September start date may be negotiable. International applicants are welcome to apply.

Ideal candidates will have:

  • Completed a 4-year undergraduate degree (bachelors or foreign equivalent) in economics, statistics, applied mathematics, or a related field;
  • A strong quantitative background and interest in learning cutting-edge research methods;
  • Creative and independent problem solving skills;
  • Experience programming in Stata and R, and may have experience with GIS, Matlab, and other statistical packages; and
  • An interest in pursuing a PhD in Economics or a related field.

Please review our Frequently Asked Questions before contacting SIEPR about this position.

Open Positions:

SIEPR is currently accepting applicants for eight fellowship positions. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling bases. Material should be submitted no later than March 31, 2018 for full consideration.

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Earnings Inequality and the Macro Economy

Professors Adrien Auclert and Isaac Sorkin

Professors Auclert and Sorkin are looking for a Predoctoral Research Fellow to work on projects aimed at understanding earnings inequality and its implications for the macroeconomy. The projects will combine administrative labor earnings data from the United States and macroeconomic models with heterogeneous agents. The fellow will get exposure to the cutting-edge of methods and concepts in applied micro- and macro-economics. Demonstrable programming skills are a must, as well as a willingness to learn and enthusiasm for economics.

Changing Markets for Health Care and Health Insurance

Professors Kate Bundorf and Laurence Baker

Professors Laurence Baker and Kate Bundorf seek a highly skilled individual to work as a Predoctoral Research Fellow for a two-year term, to begin no later than September 15, 2018. The position will involve research assistance for several projects on topics related to the U.S. health care system including studies of provider markets and public and private health insurance systems. The projects use large-scale administrative data sets, primarily public and private health insurance claims, from the United States to examine timely and policy-relevant research questions. The fellow will be exposed to a broad set of applied microeconomics research methods, will gain experience analyzing large, complex data sets and will become knowledgeable about the functioning of the U.S. health care system. Prior programming experience using SAS and/or Stata is desirable.

The Geography of Consumption

Professor Rebecca Diamond

The research fellow would work with administrative consumption datasets to analyze the importance of geographic location and income in consumption inequality. For example, does the poor's consumption depend on geographic location more than consumption of the rich? Do consumption patterns vary more by geography than by income in terms on the type of goods and services consumed? Finally, is the consumption of the rich vastly different from that of the median household, or do all income levels predominantly consume the same types of goods and services (e.g. we all watch Netflix and shop at Walmart). The Research Fellow should have taken econometrics courses, have previous research experience (senior thesis or RA position), have experience coding in STATA/R, and some basic knowledge of SQL is also useful.

Paying to Remove Disciplinary Infractions/Retirement Income Tools and Saving Decisions

Professors Gopi Shah Goda and Colleen Honigsberg

Professors Honigsberg and Goda seek a highly skilled postdoctoral research fellow to assist in their research for a one- or two-year term to begin no later than September 15, 2018. The position will involve research assistance for several projects on fraud prevention in the financial services industry (under Prof. Honigsberg's direction) and retirement and health care policy (under Prof. Goda's direction). The fellow will assist in cleaning, processing and analyzing large administrative and survey-based datasets and should be familiar with Stata, Python and LaTeX. The fellow will receive significant exposure to applied microeconomic research methods, randomized controlled trials, financial services regulation and current policies targeting the well-being of the elderly in the U.S.

Evaluating Anti-Poverty Programs

Professor David Grusky

Professor Grusky seeks three Predoctoral Research Fellows for a one-year term (with a possible extension for another year) to begin no later than September 25, 2018. The position will involve research assistance on several projects that use the new California Longitudinal Administrative Database (CLAD) for the purposes of developing improved estimates of poverty, evaluating the effects of anti-poverty programs (e.g., Earned Income Tax Credit, minimum wage, workforce development projects), and evaluating various Pay for Success interventions.

Market Segmentation and Occupational Licensing

Professor Brad Larsen

Professor Brad Larsen seeks a highly skilled individual to work as a predoctoral research fellow for a six-month term, to begin in summer of 2018 (the precise start date is flexible). The position will involve analyzing large datasets of millions of transactions and copyright infringement notices to quantify the effects of a recent Supreme Court decision that legitimized domestic resale of copyrighted goods purchased abroad (i.e. legalizing arbitrage across markets). The research fellow will also study the effects of occupational licensing using administrative data from a large online labor market. The fellow will receive exposure to and training in a broad set of empirical methods and will work with programs such as Stata, R, and Matlab, and potentially do some programming in Python.

Evaluating the Dar es Salaam BRT system

Professor Melanie Morten

Professor Morten seeks a highly skilled individual to work as a Predoctoral Research Fellow for a one-year term, based at Stanford. The position will involve research assistance for a project evaluating the economic benefits of a large-scale public transport investment in a low-income country, the Dar es Salaam Bus Rapid Transit system. This project is a collaboration between researchers from Stanford, LSE, and the World Bank. We have collected baseline and midline data and are now analyzing the data. The fellow will receive exposure to and training in a broad set of applied microeconomics research methods, and experience analyzing large and complex data sets, working with programs such as Stata, Matlab, and GIS, and will become knowledgeable about current policies about urbanization, congestion, and housing markets in a developing country context. More information about the project can be found on the IPA project page: https://www.poverty-action.org/study/closing-commute-gap-evaluation-bus-....

Intergenerational Transmission of Health and Well-being

Professors Petra Persson and Maria Polyakova

Professors Persson and Polyakova seek a highly skilled individual to work as a predoctoral research fellow. The position will involve research assistance for several projects on topics related to intergenerational transmission of health and well-being, inequality, and family structure. The projects use large-scale administrative data sets from Europe and the United States, and deliver implications for current policy debates on the design of social insurance programs such as health, prescription drug, and long-term care insurance. The fellow will receive exposure to and training in a broad set of applied microeconomics research methods, and experience analyzing large and complex data sets, working with programs such as Stata, SAS, and GIS, and will become knowledgeable about current social insurance programs targeting disadvantaged populations.

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Frequently Asked Questions:

  • When should we expect to hear about our admissions decision? We make every effort to notify all candidates by April 30, 2018.
  • What is the start date? Start dates are somewhat negotiable but must be no earlier than June 1, 2018 and no later than September 15, 2018.
  • Do you accept international applicants? Yes, we accept international applicants. International applicants will be sponsored on a J-1 visa. Students eligible for OPT are encouraged to use that during the fellowship.
  • Do we need to provide test scores for the program (GRE/GMAT/TOEFL)? No, we do not require test scores.
  • Do you accept application material by email? No, we are unable to review applications received by email. All application material should be submitted via the application portal.

For further questions, please email siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu.