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Undergraduate Research Assistant openings

The Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) has many paid openings throughout the year for undergraduate research assistants. Undergraduate RAs work directly with SIEPR faculty on research and data acquisition. Undergraduate RAs are hired on a quarterly basis and paid a standard rate of $17/hour.

Summer RAs are expected to work forty hours per week, some of which may be devoted to organized program activities and to exploring independent research topics. RAs will have the option to attend and participate actively in organized events – seminars and luncheons – organized by the Economics department. Each RA will receive a stipend of $7,500 for ten weeks of full-time research work (reduced pro rata if the period of work is less).

This program is available only to currently enrolled Stanford undergraduates. Positions are posted until filled. If you are interested, please apply early. Applications are reviewed as they are received. For questions about the program, please contact siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu. 

Open Summer RA Positions

 

Gender, Grades and Class Choices - Understanding Female Drop-Out in Economics

Faculty Mentor: Muriel Niederle

Project Description: While many sciences, including mathematics and physics, have seen large increases in the female-to-male ratio, economics is still heavily male-dominated. Women are underrepresented at every stage - starting at the undergraduate level. Goldin (2015) documents that women are more sensitive to grades in economics. In introductory economics courses, the share of low-performing men who go on to major in the field is much higher than the share of low- performing women. Goldin documents this fact at an anonymous selective university called Adams College, and this pattern is robust across schools and over time (Horvath et al. (1992), Rask and Tiefenthaler (2008), among others). We propose to assess the relative importance of different channels of influence in explaining the high drop-out of women from STEM and economics, conditional on having initially self-selected into these fields of study.

Contact: To apply, please submit your resume/CV, unofficial transcript, and a short statement explaining your interest in the position by email to nina.buchmann@stanford.edu.  Please copy siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu with your submission.

 

Government Use of AI / Machine learning for Clean Water / Policy Briefs

Faculty Mentor: Daniel Ho

Project Description: We are looking for student research assistants to help with one or more of the following projects:

  1. Research pertaining to a report (for the Administrative Conference of the United States) about government use of artificial intelligence.  For more background, see here: https://news.stanford.edu/2019/02/28/policy-lab-explores-government-administers-algorithm/policy practicum
  2. Assistance with a project using high-resolution satellite imagery to detect Clean Water Act violations.  
  3. Writing policy briefs that convey academic research findings to policymakers

Contact: To apply, please submit your resume/CV, unofficial transcript, and a short statement explaining your interest in the position by email to dho@law.stanford.edu. Please copy siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu with your submission.

 

Price Discovery in Stocks Markets During Times of War

Faculty Mentor: Peter Koudijs

Project Description: During the Siege of Paris (19 September 1870 until the French surrender on 28 January 1871), German forces had surrounded Paris and it was very hard for information get in and out of the city. Both the Paris and the regional stock exchanges operated without interruption throughout the war. We want to study how the stock exchanges incorporated new information during this period. We postulate that during normal times, most of the price discovery of French assets was done in Paris, the largest, most liquid market. We want to see whether this moved to the regional exchanges during the Siege and what role (if any) the isolated Paris exchange kept playing. This work is joint with Saumitra Jha and Marcos Salgado at Stanford GSB.

Contact: To apply, please submit your resume/CV, unofficial transcript, and a short statement explaining your interest in the position by email to koudijs@stanford.edu. Please copy siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu with your submission.

 

Empirical Analysis of Bargaining and Occupational Licensing Data

Faculty Mentor: Brad Larsen

Project Description: This research project examines the impact of occupational licensing, which are required by states for a wide range of skilled vocational activities, on the labor market. Research Assistant will perform analysis of large datasets from bargaining and occupational licensing settings.

Special Qualifications: Experience with Stata, R, Matlab, or Python is required.

Contact: To apply, please submit your resume/CV, unofficial transcript, and a short statement explaining your interest in the position by email to bjlarsen@stanford.edu. Please copy siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu with your submission.

 

Understanding the Scope and Size of America’s Social Safety Net

Faculty Mentor: Tom MaCurdy

Project Description: This project will document all the federal and state programs making up the income support/maintenance systems in the US, focused on depicting the levels of participation and spending in the different programs from historical, current and projected future perspectives. The project will address who in America’s population receives resources from anti-poverty programs, and how much income transfer occurs now and can be sustained over the next couple of decades.

Contact: To apply, please submit your resume/CV, unofficial transcript, and a short statement explaining your interest in the position by email to tmac@stanford.edu. Please copy siepr-fellowships@stanford.edu with your submission.